Gear

Fuji X-T20 vs X-T2: How do they compare?

Fujifilm’s X-T20 might be viewed as a cut-down X-T2, but it does have a handful of advantages too. Here, we check out where the two differ.

Design and ergonomics

The X-T20 is very similar in design to the X-T10 it updates. The body is lighter than the X-T2’s while the more compact design means it doesn’t offer as much of a grip. Furthermore, the dials on the top plate are also smaller, perhaps a little too small for larger handed users.

The main difference on the top plate is that, whereas the X-T2 sports a dial for regulating ISO, the X-T20 has one that provides access to different drive modes, panoramic shooting and the movie function among other things.

Fujifilm X-T20
Fujifilm X-T20
Fujifilm X-T2
Fujifilm X-T2

On the X-T2 these options are accessed through the slightly fiddly collar beneath the ISO dial. If you tend to keep your camera set to Auto ISO you may find the X-T20’s setup more convenient, but the X-T2 does at least give you more immediate access to both.

The X-T20 also misses out on the X-T2’s weather resistance and does not have its elder sibling’s AF joystick. To move the AF point on the X-T20 you have to either use the D-pad buttons or use the touchscreen, the latter of which is absent on the X-T2.

On the subject of screens, while both cameras have these mounted on a hinge that allows them to be tilted, the X-T2’s screen can also be adjusted sideways to make portrait-orientation shooting from awkward angles easier. So, if you tend to capture portrait images using the LCD screen rather than the viewfinder, you may prefer the greater flexibility on the X-T2.

Another point of difference is that the X-T2 comes with a seperate flash in its box while the X-T20 has one incorporated into its top plate.

Image Quality

Each camera has an 24.3MP APS-C X-Trans CMOS III sensor paired with an X-Processor Pro engine, and the two share the same collection of Film Simulation options such as Acros and Vivid/Velvia, so we should expect the output to be similar.

Fujifilm X-T20
Fujifilm X-T20
Fujifilm X-T2
Fujifilm X-T2

Although both cameras offer mechanical and electronic shutters, the X-T2 can fire at a maximum 1/8000sec using its mechanical shutter while the X-T20 only goes up to 1/4000sec. Both of these figures go higher with each camera’s electronic shutter, but this may still be something worth thinking about if you plan on capturing moving subjects at particularly fast shutter speeds.

Special Features

Both cameras make use of an OLED-panelled electronic viewfinder with 2.36million dots, but the 0.77x magnification offered by the X-T2’s finder trumps the 0.62x magnification on the X-T20.

Both cameras can also fire at 8fps using their mechanical shutters and 14fps with their electronic ones, although the X-T2 can have its mechanical shutter operate at 11fps when using the optional Vertical Power Booster Grip VPB-XT2. This is not possible on the X-T20 as there is not currently a battery grip available for that model. Something else worth noting is that the buffer is also more generous on the X-T2 than it is on the X-T20.

Fujifilm X-T20
Fujifilm X-T20

Fujifilm X-T2
Fujifilm X-T2

The lack of a battery grip for the X-T20 also means you have to make do with a 350-shot-per-charge battery life. The battery grip for the X-T2 houses two extra 340-shot batteries, with the entire combination allowing for approximately 1000 frames in total.

Those intent on capturing plenty of 4K footage or images for extended periods will also be interested to know that the X-T2 sports dual cards slots and UHS-II compatibility, next to the X-T20’s single card slot that only offers support for UHS-I.

Another difference is that the X-T2 offers a customizable AF-C function in addition to the five presets, while the X-T20 only offers the presets alone. This system is, however, relatively advanced and broad in its functions to begin with, so you may not feel the need to create one anyway.

Video Quality

Both the X-T2 and X-T20 are capable of recording 4K UHD (3840x2160p), but the X-T2 has the option of an F-Log setting, something missing on the X-T20. The X-T20 also uses the full width of the sensor for 4K recording, which means that footage isn’t subject to the same crop factor as that from the X-T2, although there is likely to be a difference in quality between the two due to how each samples the scene.

Fujifilm X-T20
Fujifilm X-T20
Fujifilm X-T2
Fujifilm X-T2

Both bodies have mic ports built into them, although the X-T20 has been designed with a 2.5mm port, while the X-T2 has a more standard 3.5mm port. Neither body has an integrated headphone port, although this is designed into the X-T2’s optional battery grip.

Conclusion

The main draw of the X-T20 is that it combines much of the X-T2’s spec in a smaller and more affordable body. At the time of writing, the X-T20 can be had for almost half the X-T2’s price, although if you opt for a kit configuration the difference between the two isn’t quite as great.

While it lacks the X-T20’s touchscreen and built-in flash, most people will consider the X-T2 to be the better-specified option. Even so, the X-T20 undoubtedly provides far better value for money when you consider how much of the X-T20’s feature set it provides. So, unless you need the X-T2’s extras, you’re likely to view the X-T20 as the more appealing proposition.

Click here if you want more information for X-T20.