Culture

Instagram Account #everydayclimatechange Documenting Our Warming World

Led by photographer James Whitlow Delano, this social awareness project showcases stunning images from artists around the world aiming to put issues such as the increasing prominence of water shortage and the imminent danger of irresponsible farming with the aim of starting a global discussion.

The account Everyday Climate Change shows the most striking and powerful images, along with the stories that accompany them. The project launched in January of this year, and the account currently has almost 30,000 followers with over 600 self posts and over 3,000 images tagged with #everydayclimatechange by users.

Click here to read Delano’s interview with treehugger.com

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@suthepkritsanavarin for @everydayclimatechange
Sam Nang is an eight years old Cambodian girl. She help her father to fishing in Tonle Sap Lake. The lake is the largest lake in Southeast Asia. The lake are connected with Mekong River and it is one of the most important fishing spots in the region. Fish from the lake provide major protein for Cambodian people. For the last few years, the uncertain of water level, dam and climate change had change the pattern of fish migration. The life of local people like this girl will be harder for next decade. Mekong River is the most productive inland fishery in the world. But the last few years saw declining of fish. The cause of fish declining may cause by many reasons such as over fishing, damming and global warming as well. The global warming or climate change effect the fish migration in several ways. It could change fish behavior for delaying migration. It is also changing rainfall patterns and water scarcity which is impacting on river fisheries and aquaculture production.” ‪ Check out our Indiegogo campaign to fund "EverdayClimateChange at Photoville in New York, 10 – 20 September. https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/everydayclimatechange-at-photoville–2/x/11870259#/story #climatechange‬‬ ‪#globalwarming‬‬ ‪#climatechangeisreal‬‬ ‬#cambodia #mekongriver #fishing #river #southeastasia #tonlesap #lake

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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange @everydayclimatechange will exhibit at @photovillnyc in New York 10 – 20 September 2015 in DUMBO/#brooklynbridgepark Woman leaves a morning market, full of food and fish cultivated locally, climbing a narrow bridge over a channel in the Mekong River Delta. Vietnam. The 40,000 square km (1,544 square mile) Mekong River Delta is little more the 2 meters, or 6 1/2 feet above sea level, making if particularly vulnerable on rising sea levels. In fact, many rice paddies in the delta, the rice bowl of Vietnam, have already been converted to shrimp farms due to infiltration of salt water making them unsuitable to wet paddy rice cultivation. Further exacerbating the problem are dams built or being built upstream mostly in Laos, Cambodia, Thailand and in China will begin to reduces the monsoon season high water, allowing more salt water to enter the Mekong River Delta and reduce the flow of fertile sediment that reinvigorates the soil. The Union of Concerned Scientists says, "Because around 78 percent of the delta's land is used for rice production, such flooding today would cause approximately $17 billion in economic losses—a substantial percentage of Vietnam's gross domestic product. By 2050, sea level rise in the delta could directly affect an estimated 1 million people or more." #climatechange #globalwarming #climatechangeisreal #photoville #photovillenyc #photoville2015 #vietnam #mekong #mekongriverdelta #risingsealevels #jameswhitlowdelano

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Photo by James Whitlow Delano @jameswhitlowdelano for @everydayclimatechange Monk stands phoenix-like, on the second floor of Gwaja Monastery left in ruins by Cyclone Nargis in Pyapon, Irrawaddy Delta, Burma (Myanmar). Over 138,000 people perished in Cyclone Nargis, the worst natural disaster in recorded history in Burma (Myanmar). Somehow this monastery survived while bodies piled up across the river. Clearly shaken, the monks still offered the community comfort after this super-storm for which the government offered little warning and no evacuation was conducted. Days passed before relief supplies finally arrived. Storms of this size used to be rare and usually were blown off toward India on the other side of the Bay of Bengal, but with rising sea temperatures such storms are becoming far more common and intense even in areas in the tropical storm belts. #climatechange #globalwarming #climatechangeisreal #cyclone #extremeweather #superstorm #typhoon #hurricane #burma #myanmar #nargis #buddhism #buddhist Check out our friends @jameswhitlowdelano @everydayafrica@everydaylatinamerica @everydayusa@everydaymiddleeast @everydayiran@everydayeverywhere @azdarya We're beginning to re-post photos with hashtag #everydayclimatechange #climatechange

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Photo by #jbrussell for #everydayclimatechange Wood burning fish smoking ovens in full operation on the beaches of the #Casamance region of #Senegal. Thousands of tons of fish are smoked, salted, dried and exported throughout West #Africa each year, playing an important role in the local economy. The coastal zone of Casamance is home to Africa's most important mangrove forests. #Mangroves are extremely efficient #carbonsinks that help to reduce #greenhouse gases and the effects of #climatechange. The cutting of wood to feed the fish smoking industry and for building have significantly degraded the region's mangroves and forests. The United Nations Environmental Programme has called mangrove forests one of the most threatened ecosystems on the planet because they are being destroyed at a rate several times faster than global deforestation. #Kafountine #Senegal #climatechangeisreal

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Images from EverydayClimateChange will be featured at Photoville, a free photography exhibit in Brooklyn, New York from 10 – 20 September 2015.

Delano is currently running an Indiegogo campaign to help fund the costs of production and travel.